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  • Venue Spotlight: Washington House Hotel and Restaurant

    A Historic Spin on Your Next Event

     
    FROM THE Spring 2017 ISSUE
     

The Washington House Hotel and Restaurant and Sellersville Theater 1894 have been a refuge for Pennsylvanians since the original farmhouse was built in the 1700s. Over the past 100 years, the property has transformed from a simple farmhouse into what it is today, an 11-room boutique hotel and 340-seat theater. “Every inch of the two buildings have been renovated, some areas more than once,” says Elayne Brick, proprietor and co-owner with husband William Quigley. “Our latest renovation was to reopen the hotel above the restaurant with modern facilities.” To modernize the hotel, they added a foyer, a conference room and redesigned the upper floors to offer five standard rooms with baths, a wheelchair-accessible room as well as three Queen suites, one King suite and one Tower suite that has access to a 360-degree view from the Tower Observatory.

For events, the conference room can accommodate up to 12 for small business meetings, its dining rooms can accommodate between 13 to 40 people and the theater seats up to 300 (with the option to add more space) for a meeting or presentation. “We offer a beautiful, comfortable venue for any occasion and an attentive staff that will go out of their way to make planning and execution enjoyable for all,” says Brick.

INSPIRATION

The texture of the Norman Arch leading into the historic Masonic Temple in Philadelphia inspired this clean, midcentury modern table.

DETAILS

This summer table fit for a special event, such as a chairman’s dinner, features a mix of midcentury design with modern elements. Carolyn Rizzo, head designer of Garnish, says this technique is easily accomplished in décor but challenging to pull off in event design.

 

This museum promises to share a story that is not quite the one we learned in school. George Washington does indeed make an appearance—you can see the tent that he used as his headquarters in an interactive exhibit—but Museum of the American Revolution promises to tell a tale that is lesser known. From the first shots of the Revolutionary War to the formation of the United States, its mission is to tell the story of everyone from slaves and Native Americans to women who took up arms to fight for the cause.